Daddy-Daughter Book Review: Edward the Emu

Edward the Emu

So a package arrived the other day from my Aunt Claire.  Like most parcels these days, it mostly included stuff for my soon-to-arrive son and already well established daughter.  Amongst this particular treasure trove was a book.  An Australian book to be exact.  And inside said book was a note; a request to review it right here in this ol’ blog o’ mine.

Challenge accepted Claire.

Now if you’ve read my previous book reviews you know that I often find myself reading the same books over, and over, and over again.  It can get to be tiresome.  And as a result, I have learned to be a bit critical with their content, ranking them on the following dad-centric criteria:

  1.    How fun is it to read?
  2.    What is the quality of the artwork?
  3.    How high is the reading level?

If a book scores highly in all three, I’m much more likely to indulge Audrey’s book reading whims and drive a particular book into the ground.  So with that in mind, let’s peck our way into Sheena Knowles’s “Edward the Emu” and see what tasty nuggets we find inside.

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Daddy-Daughter Book Review: Mister Seahorse

Mister Seahorse Cover

I spend a lot of time reading to my daughter.  It’s one of our favorite pastimes.  But despite the dozens of books we have on hand at any given moment, Audrey has her favorites.  And those favorites, well, she makes me read them over, and over…

And over again.

It can get to be tiresome.  And as a result, I have learned to be a bit critical with their content, ranking them on the following dad-centric criteria:

  1.    How fun is it to read?
  2.    What is the quality of the artwork?
  3.    How high is the reading level?

If a book scores highly in all three, I’m much more likely to indulge Audrey’s book reading whims and drive a particular book into the ground.  So with that in mind, let’s dive into Eric Carle’s “Mister Seahorse” and see what we find.

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Daddy-Daughter Book Review: I Want My Hat Back

I Want My Hat Back Cover

I spend a lot of time reading to my daughter.  It’s one of our favorite pastimes.  But despite the dozens of books we have on hand at any given moment, Audrey has her favorites.  And those favorites, well, she makes me read them over, and over…

And over again.

It can get to be tiresome.  And as a result, I have learned to be a bit critical with their content, ranking them on the following parent-centric criteria:

  1.    How fun is it to read?
  2.    What is the quality of the artwork?
  3.    How high is the reading level?

If a book scores highly in all three, I’m much more likely to indulge Audrey’s book reading whims and drive a particular book into the ground.  So with that in mind, let’s search high and low through Jon Klassen’s “I Want My Hat Back” and see what we find.

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Daddy-Daughter Book Review: Merry Christmas, Maisy

Maisy Cover

I spend a lot of time reading to my daughter.  It’s a great way to pass the time.  But it can admittedly be a bit frustrating reading the same book over and over again.  Thanks to this endless repetition, I have learned to rank her books on three criteria:

  1.    Is it fun to read?
  2.    Is the artwork interesting to look at?
  3.    Is it a bit beyond my child’s so-called reading level?

If a book scores highly in all three, I’m much more likely to indulge Audrey’s book reading whims.  So with that in mind, let’s unwrap Lucy Cousins’ “Merry Christmas, Maisy” and see what we find.

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Daddy-Daughter Book Review: Pirateria

Pirateria Cover

I spend a lot of time reading to my daughter.  It’s a good way to pass the time too, just so long as its not the fifth time I’ve read the particular book in the past eight hours.

The thing about reviews for children’s books, however, is that people tend to focus on the child.  And for good reason, of course.  But what typically isn’t discussed is the reader’s point of view.  It’s boring reading the same book over and over to a child.  She never tires of it, but I can readily admit that I do.

Thanks to this endless repetition, I have learned to rank her books on three criteria—all of which boost my enthusiasm and willingness to read them:

  1. Is it fun to read?
  2. Is it full of interesting artwork?
  3. Is it a bit beyond my child’s so-called reading level?

If a book scores highly in all three of those, I’m a much happier camper.  So let’s take a look at Calef Brown’s Pirateria.

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